My Atlanta: Ron Sherman will work “as long as there’s a camera in my hands”

My Atlanta: Ron Sherman will work “as long as there’s a camera in my hands”

Editor’s Note: Our new series, “My Atlanta,” shines a spotlight on photographers, who use their images and supporting captions to illustrate how living in Atlanta has inspired their careers and lives. In this story, we highlight the work and words of Ron Sherman.

I fell in love with Atlanta for many reasons. The beauty and vibrancy of the city were evident even before I moved here in 1971. Once I did, its growth gave me unlimited possibilities to document the region. With new buildings, expanded parks, various festivals, attractions and celebrations, there was never a shortage of self-appointed subjects to photograph or, especially, paid work.

When my wife and I first started thinking about moving, we considered many places across the country, settling in Atlanta, which seemed to have so many possibilities as a city on the move: growing, churning, reinventing itself.

Doors opened as my career grew here. I’ve worked for national magazines, including Time, Life, Newsweek me workweek. At a very different time in American life, I got close access to Jimmy Carter during his presidential campaign, Hank Aaron as he watched his 715th home run fly over the outer fence of the Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, and Coretta Scott King surrounded of Civil and Human Rights leaders at Martin Luther King Jr.

ron sherman
Ron Sherman has been photographing Atlanta and Atlantans for over 50 years.

I joined the new Atlanta Press Photographers Association in 1972 and served on the committee that started the Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, which will mark 50 years of continuous service at its convention in mid-November. In the mid-1970s, I started the Atlanta chapter of the American Society of Magazine Photographers, the first southeast chapter. Through meetings of these two organizations, I established relationships with local photographers, developing an exchange of information, including job leads, although sometimes we were looking for business with the same clients. The idea crossed my mind early on that there were many cities where this type of exchange would not occur at all. In Atlanta, of course, yes.

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I am honored that the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library at Emory University acquired nearly 750 of my gelatin silver prints in 2014. They merge into a sort of time capsule of the 1970s , a critical moment of change in our city. Last June, the library acquired my photographic archive, dating from 1971 to 2001, consisting of 500,000 black and white negatives, contact sheets, 35mm color transparencies, digital files, and annotations. My archives are now a permanent home for current research and a rewarding historical resource for my life’s work. As a resident of Roswell, I am also pleased that an exhibition of photography from throughout my career is on view at the Roswell Center for Cultural Arts through September 29.

For all that, I am definitely not stuck in the past, I prefer to live and film in the present. My photographic adventures in Atlanta will continue as long as I have a camera in my hands.

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Chastain Park, 2009: Of Atlanta’s hundreds of parks, I’ve always found Chastain Park to be one of the best. It has many amenities including a golf course, arts center, amphitheater, horse park, walking trails, swimming pool, and tennis courts. But in spring, it’s the glorious flowering dogwoods that catch my eye.

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ron sherman

Hank Aaron’s 715th Home Run: My most iconic image from the game in which Hank broke Babe Ruth’s record was of Hammer loitering around bases as two teenagers chased after him to extend their congratulations between second and third base. This image, photographed for United Press International, was published around the world that night. This photo of Hank holding the baseball record was challenging because there were dozens of photographers around him at home plate. I made sure I was in a position to get the shot I wanted.

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ron sherman

Atlanta Skyline, 1990: Of the countless Atlanta skyline photographs I’ve composed, this scene has remained the most consistent over the years. This south-facing angle, taken from the roof of a Summerhill apartment building under construction on I-20, provided me with excellent downtown sunrises and sunsets. By the way, this sunset image is not filtered.

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AJC Press Room, 1980: As a paperboy and high school impersonator (in cleveland press) and one adult staff photographer (in Rochester and Milwaukee Journal), I was fascinated by the news business. It was exciting to see my photos coming off the press, especially on page 1 above the fold. When the daily print newspapers run out, it will be a sad day for all readers. I will miss my ink-stained fingers very much.

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ron sherman

1991 Atlanta Braves Victory Parade: The Braves went from worst to first, winning the Western Division, which was the subject of a rock party on Peachtree Street. Wearing his backwards hat in style here, David Justice became the hero in 1995 when the Braves won the World Series, scoring the game-winning goal of Game 6 with a solo home run.

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The nonprofit organization Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic (now called Learning Ally), which was based in Atlanta at the time, gave Ramón Medina the confidence to address mental and physical disabilities. Filming in eight cities, I learned a great deal about the lives and accomplishments of each person I interviewed and photographed for this special publication. His stories stayed with me.

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ron sherman

Turner Field, 1997: After covering baseball since 1971 at the old Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, it was a joy to take pictures during the Braves’ season opener at the transformed Olympic Stadium. The architect and team wanted to celebrate this new chapter with something special. I was happy to create the requested image.

Source : dial.news

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About the Author: Pierre Cohen

A person who has expertise in politics and writes articles to fill his spare time as a hobby.